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, african-americans and you go there and become the united nations and navigate the way through, and you go to the farm and working, and dealing with the determination they are facing, and so you're on the other end of the usda seeing exactly how the discriminatory policies, what they are on the ground, seeing farmers having land foreclosed upon and knowing that there was a mean spiritedness the way they foreclosed on their land. tell us a little bit about that. >> you know, one of the things i had to do, and i was determined, and i was determined that everyone who worked with me did that. we -- i made sure we learned those regulations better than the folks working in those offices so you would know when they were doing something or saying something wrong. you could know when you were -- anyone who ever had to deal with discrimination know when that happens, but to know exactly what that person is doing to you that's wrong is what i wanted us to -- and i needed to be able to do that to challenge them. i could remember a farmer called me -- he had been -- he received a letter to come into th
national constitutions of which are aware. deasy to amend that the united states constitution. the flavors were not -- did not suffer from the illusions of grandeur that we often project on to them. they did not believe that they were getting it just right once and for all. article five is a testament to the fact that they thought amendments would be buckley and necessary. indeed, the convention might be desirable. article five says the convention with two-thirds of the state. to err is human. it is our fault that we have projected on to them this notion that we were demi guns and that we don't adequately discussed of the imminence we have done and what took to get them. it ticket least a half century. the was movement began in 48. the 19th amendment comes along in 1920. we get the 13th and 14th and 15th amendment because of war and because the radical republicans who were able to affect successfully seized control of government, in part -- and i applaud this, by threatening to impeach andrea johnson. it will to push through changes that otherwise would not have occurred. quite frankly i h
25 new citizens of the united states. the national archives has hosted a ceremony for decades. it never ceases to impress the prospective citizens out to support and defend the constitution in front of the actual document. we encourage you to return over the next several days for more discussions, films, and special events for the constitution to protect. on monday september 17th at noon we do happy birthday here in the theater. a special program in celebration of the signing of the constitution in the first 225 test will join the founding fathers for cake after the performance. now, wednesday september 19th at 7:00 p.m. the constitution and the war of 1812 here in the theater. the 2012 lecture. journalist roger mudd moderates a panel discussion on what are probably helped misses from 1812. tonight two distinguished guests discussed the past, present and future of the nest its constitution. professor of law and political science at university. he teaches constitutional law at the college and law school. he received his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor of the yal
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
at the iraq war and do you think it has been fair and comprehensive? >> it depends which nation of the media you're asking about. >> host: the united states? >> host: i think we have done a very good job. we were too blinded by the actions to 9/11 and we did not face questions that help us make the decision to go into iraq. and we have persisted in the iraqi side. in fact, to find out what was really going on in iraq and the war, i had to petition french journalists. people spoke out the newbie area. we had a few, but not enough. and then we have a certain amount of censorship and not being allowed to see the bodies of soldiers coming home or the coffins, rather, whether it's the dead on either side. there have been individual reporters who have done an incredible job of covering the award. and i would like to pay tribute. may they rest in peace, those who have lost their lives in the region. >> host: helen benedict have you written about were previously? or was it just this war to grab you? >> i have never written about combat on the ground the way that i have in the past. this is a new sub
in the united states. it will amaze you of how much our history as a nation is wrapped up with people who came from all over the world with all kinds of experiences they brought with them in collective or cooperative or community enterprise. last point. the knights of labor, the forerunner of the afl-cio in american labor history, had a two-pronged central for labor, and it went like this: one thing that we do is help workers negotiate a better deal with the employer, better wages, better working conditions. all the things we are familiar with that unions do. but that's only one. that's a defensive goal. we also have another thing we're engaged in which is to get beyond being dependent on an employer. be and that meant for them the organization and building of collective, cooperative, noncapitalist enterprises wher there wouldn't be a few people who are employers and everybody else who's an employee. that was defeated at the end of the 9th century, and the -- 19th century, and the afl, and the cio gave up on that. two years ago something remarkable happened. a major american union, steel worke
a question about the citizens united which you have spoken about today and particularly since that affect how politics are here and how the money place in politics whether you anticipate looking forward in the next few years as we engage nationally in a conversation how many plays into politics what role you see the court playing and particular issues or ways in which the court might continue to exercise a role in that conversation. >> for us to get on a different path between the different supreme court's -- [applause] the court this last term was given an indication, and you sound like you know a lot about this in the montana case the court basically served up on a silver platter an opportunity to scale back if we still live on citizens united so the state of montana came in and said, you know, you said and citizens united that there's no proof that money causes corruption and politics but we are here to tell you it happened to us when our states are controlled by the mining interests and so on and senators were bought and sold, and so we have this on hundred plus-year-old statute on the bo
in the united states of america, and we know the problem with the democracies now is not the dogmatic decisions of religions, but some decisions of frans national cooperation and economy power deciding without being able to say anything and we cull it democracy, still today dealing with power that are beyond the procedure. the banks, transnational cooperation, and, for example, in greece, in spain, in italy, we have those coming to solve the problem we never elected them, but money is choosing them. we have to deal with not simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from states, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on to the state which is also imposing decision on to us as citizens. this western model, i think, be washington. we all have to deal with problems and crisis from within. i wouldn't push the arab world to follow blindly the western model, but take the better, the best from the others and try their own way. having said that, the first problem is the nature of the state. why -- i was referring to this dpsh voided referring to islamic states, and if you
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8